2016: The Year Seattle Embraced Virtual and Augmented Reality

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Trond Nilsen addressing the September VR Hackathon

Ed: This post was made possible by the mad compiling and organization skills of Eva Hoerth and Kayla Didier.

As we pull the curtains on 2016, we’re coming to a consensus that this was a horrible, no-good, rotten, very bad year. We lost cherished icons and elevated a reality star bigot to the office of President of the United States. Terrorism, refugee crises, Brexit, and other calamities flowed through our news feeds amid fake news concocted by Russian spies, climate change deniers, and white supremacists. And yet a bright spot appeared this year, particularly in the Pacific Northwest, with the emergence of the virtual and augmented reality industry. Continue reading “2016: The Year Seattle Embraced Virtual and Augmented Reality”

Welcome Correspondents Amanda Knox and Christopher Robinson

Last spring I started writing about Seattle’s VR/AR industry on this little blog with a self-deprecating name. I often feel like a small town reporter, following the goings-on of a passionate and growing community of VR pioneers. I’m having a blast doing this, and it’s time for this little operation to grow. So I’m thrilled to announce that this blog just got a little more … Continue reading Welcome Correspondents Amanda Knox and Christopher Robinson

Amplifying Empathy, by Christopher Robinson and Amanda Knox

Editor’s Note: Writers Christopher Robinson and Amanda Knox, a real-life couple, recently experienced Machine to Be Another. Following is their exclusive report for ryanboudinotisahack.com.

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Robinson and Knox experiencing Machine to Be Another

Amplifying Empathy

By Amanda Knox and Christopher Robinson

The Machine to Be Another is an experiment, an experience, and an interactive art installation created by Barcelona’s BeAnotherLab that allows two people to embody each other through virtual reality. As presented at TWIST: Seattle Queer Film Festival, the experience includes three phases: 1) participants swap perspectives and adjust by slowly mirroring each other’s movements; 2) mirrors are introduced, allowing participants to see the body they are inhabiting; and 3) the partition is removed, allowing the participants to see their own bodies as viewed from the other’s perspective. As partners, we tried the Machine together. The following is a mimetic response to the experience, written in three parts corresponding to the three phases.

Continue reading “Amplifying Empathy, by Christopher Robinson and Amanda Knox”